April 30, Luncheon Speaker Series – Responding to the Central American Crisis

Donald Trump’s repeated calls to “build a wall” and his threat to cut off development assistance to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador overlook the complex causes of Central American migration to the United States and the ways in which the U.S. is implicated in migrants’ decision to leave their homes. In this talk, Laura Macdonald examines the causes of migration and the recent caravans, and the role of the Mexican government. She calls for a regional response, including from Canada, to the overlapping environmental, economic, and security crises faced by the region.

Sarah Bowles

March 29, Fundraiser: Jazz and Dinner with, Stay Tuned / Restez-à-l’écoute

Event Poster (Pdf) Please join us for an evening of dinner and Jazz at Jambo restaurant. Enjoy the “true taste of Africa” and the music of,  Stay Tuned / Restez-à-l’écoute. To guarantee your seat call the restaurant and make your reservation, 613-726-9393. Donations are greatly appreciated, and vital to the Group of 78’s work.  They help us provide… Read More »

Sarah Bowles

Please Sign this Open Letter To the Prime Minister: Statement of concern on the crisis in Venezuela

The following open letter was sent to the Prime Minister of Canada today from 167 signatories and 15 Canadian organizations, concerning the crisis in Venezuela. If you would like to add your name to the letter please use the online form provided. Download letter (with the list of original signatories): English and French Pdf French Pdf English Pdf… Read More »

Governance of African Land Rights and Implications for Women

The Coalition for Equitable Land Acquisitions and Development in Africa (CELADA) invites students, faculty, and policy makers to explore the potential for Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy to strengthen Africa women’s access and rights to land. A panel discussion moderated by Christopher Huggins, uOttawa will feature: Nyambura Githaiga, Canadian Foodgrains Bank, Lindsay Mossman, Aga Khan Foundation, Shakilla Umutoni,… Read More »

Sarah Bowles

March 26, Luncheon Speaker Series – Can Canada Do More for Refugees?

Western countries have been prone to populist rhetoric that is leading to more and more stringent and security-focused policies. If Western media highlighted the Rohingya refugee crisis for a few months, most crises remain underreported and as a result, the gap between humanitarian funding requirements to save lives and donations – from governments in particular – is increasing. Solutions exist though – including in Canada through resettlement of the most vulnerable – although the gap between the needs and the spaces offered is similarly increasing. What is the role of Canada in addressing these challenges and seizing opportunities to do better?

Sarah Bowles

Feb 26, Luncheon Speaker Series – Canada’s “Illusory Foreign Policy”: How Canada Addresses the World, One Gesture at a Time

Andrew Cohen is an author, columnist, broadcaster, and professor of journalism at Carleton University. He teaches courses on Canada and the United States, Canada and the World, and analytical writing.
In a career of 40 years, he has written for The Globe and Mail, The New York Times, Foreign Affairs, United Press International, Time, CNN.com, and The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, among other publications.
He has won two National Newspaper Awards and three National Magazine Awards and been awarded the Queen’s Jubilee Medal. He writes a weekly column for The Ottawa Citizen and appears as a commentator on CTV News Channel on U.S. politics.
His seven books cover subjects ranging from Canada’s constitutional politics to national character to Arctic exploration. His study of Canadian foreign policy — While Canada Slept: How We Lost Our Place in the World — was a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction.

Sarah Bowles

Bolsonaro in Power: The Why, The Ugly, and The Foggy

Jair Bolsonaro was sworn in as President of Brazil on January 1st. An ultra-conservative, bitter, prejudiced and verbally aggressive admirer of Brazil’s military regime, he had been on the political and ideological fringe for more than two decades but now finds himself as the head of one of the world’s largest countries, whether by territory, population or the economy. His election, last October, was met the world over by shrill warnings of fascism and hair-raising comparisons with the Philippines’ Rodrigo Duterte, and Chile’s Augusto Pinochet—whom he praised during the campaign.