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WEBINAR – Why the ‘Trump era’ could last for thirty years

August 25 @ 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Free – $10

August 25, 2020 – 11:00-12:30 p.m. (EDT, GMT-4)

UK time (4 pm-5:30 pm) and all-India time (8:30 pm- 10 pm)

Online Registration

Tickets:
$10.00 – Suggested
or Free 

Moderator:

Manfred Bienefeld

Professor Emeritus, School of Policy and Public Administration

Speakers

Jayati Ghosh

Professor of Economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

Robert H. Wade

Professor of global political economy at the London School of Economics.

Outline

Will even a one-term Trump presidency mark the start of a decades-long era of more authoritarian nationalism and of more compromised internationalism? With support for liberal internationalism long in decline, can the shift in the western world’s centre of gravity towards unilateralism, authoritarianism and militarism be reversed, even as incomes and labour markets continue to polarize, and as corporate and financial interests seek to use more authoritarian and divisive governments to support even greater freedom of movement for international capital? What are the prospects that progressive forces in the developed, and the developing world, can use the newfound – largely Covid-19 induced – appreciation of the need for strong, capable states to protect the public interest in times of growing uncertainty, to build decisive political counter-movement from the bottom up?

Moderator

Manfred Bienefeld

Professor Emeritus, School of Policy and Public Administration

Manfred A. Bienefeld is a professor in the School of Public Policy and Administration at Carleton University. His current research interests include, development policy, wages/employment, commodity/capital markets, human capital, technology/industrialization, development and the environment, development in a historical perspective, his area interests include Africa, Canada, the Pacific, and East Asia and his issue interests include, issue interests, the debt crisis protectionism, industrial policy, planning, privatization, the “newly industrializing countries.” He has edited (with Jane Jenson and Rianne Mahon) Production, Space, Identity, Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press 1993.

Speakers

Jayati Ghosh,

Professor of Economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi

Her research interests include globalisation, international trade and finance, employment patterns, macroeconomic policy, gender issues, poverty and inequality. She has authored and/or edited a dozen books and around 200 scholarly articles. Recent books include Demonetisation Decoded: A critique of India’s monetary experiment and India and the International Economy, (Oxford University Press 2015). She has received several national and international prizes, including the M. Adisheshaiah Award for distinguished contributions to the social sciences in India in 2015, and the International Labour Organisation’s Decent Work Research Prize for 2010. She has advised governments in India and other countries. She was the Chairperson of the Andhra Pradesh Commission on Farmers’ Welfare in 2004, and Member of the National Knowledge Commission reporting to the Prime Minister of India (2005-09). She is the Executive Secretary of International Development Economics Associates (www.networkideas.org), an international network of heterodox development economists. She has consulted for several international organisations including ILO, UNDP, UNCTAD, UN-DESA, UNRISD and UN Women and is member of several international commissions. She writes regularly for popular media like newspapers, journals and blogs.

Robert H. Wade

Professor of global political economy at the London School of Economics.

He was awarded the Leontief Prize for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought in 2008. His book Governing the Market: Economic Theory and the Role of Government in East Asia’s Industrialization (Princeton University Press, 1990, 2004) won the American Political Science Association’s award of Best Book in Political Economy for 1989-91. He was an invited member of the Financial Times’ “Economists’ Forum”, described as “50 of the world’s most influential economists.” A New Zealand citizen, he worked earlier at the Institute of Development Studies (Sussex University), the World Bank, US Congress (Office of Technology Assessment), Princeton University (Woodrow Wilson School), MIT (Sloan School), and Brown University (Watson Institute). He has conducted fieldwork in Pitcairn Island, Italy, India, Korea, Taiwan, Iceland, and inside the World Bank and IMF – all steered by an interest in Adam Smith-type questions about how economies create and distribute the basis for material well-being. His recent publications deal with: trends in global growth, poverty and income/wealth distribution; the developmental state (alive or dead?); industrial policy; financial crises; the governance of international economic organizations (eg World Bank, IMF, G20); the “invisible strings” of the Core-Periphery structure of the world economy; and the profession and ethics of economists. His other books include : Irrigation and Politics in South Korea (1982), Village Republics: The Economic Conditions of Collective Action in India (1988, 1994, 2007). 

 


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Details

Date:
August 25
Time:
11:00 am - 12:30 pm
Cost:
Free – $10
Event Category:
Website:
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/why-the-trump-era-could-last-for-thirty-years-tickets-117018683031

Venue

Webinar

Organizer

Group of 78
Phone:
613-565-9449
Email:
group78@group78.org
Website:
www.group78.org
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